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Everything you need to know about stem cell treatments and their role in the future of healthcare and regenerative medicine.

The latest

News, opinion and advice on stem cell research and treatment, from Wideacademy.

Second Opinion

"Acid attack victim may regain sight with stem cell treatment" (Evening Standard )

What do our experts say?

WideCells CSO Professor Peter Hollands reports on work being conducted to restore eyesight using stem cells: An interesting case here , with an acid attack victim blinded in one eye undergoing stem cell therapy 24 years after the fact. If they can restore his vision, as far as I’m aware it would be a world first. This isn’t the only work being conducted to restore eyesight with stem cells (a…
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by Professor Peter Hollands 23 June, 2018

Feature

Systemic Mastocytosis and stem cell treatment for myeloproliferative neoplasm

by Wideacademy - 21 June, 2018

  • Myeloproliferative Disorder

What is Systemic Mastocytosis? Systemic Mastocytosis, also known as Systemic Mast Cell Disease, is a myeloproliferative neoplasm. It is characterised by the abnormal accumulation of mast cells in tissue and organs, such as the bone marrow, skin, gastrointestinal tract and the spleen. Mast cells are groups of leukolytes, produced in the bone marrow, forming part of the immune system. They release chemicals called mediators in response to antibodies in order to fight infection. Mediators can trigger allergic reactions, such as when histamine (which causes the blood vessels to expand and the…

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Feature

Umbilical clamping: how long after birth should the cord be cut?

by Wideacademy - 20 June, 2018

  • Cord blood

Professor Peter Hollands, Group Chief Scientific Officer at WideCells Group PLC, reflects on the debate over the timing of umbilical cord clamping and presents Wideacademy's position on the matter: There has been much discussion recently, both in the medical profession and among the general public, regarding the timing of umbilical cord clamping at the birth of a baby. Some people propose that ‘early’ clamping (less than 1 minute after the birth of the baby) could deprive the baby of much needed blood and that later clamping, when the umbilical cord itself appears white, is beneficial to the…

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Who might be interested in this

  • Parents of young children
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Second Opinion

"Tiny baby undergoes stem cell transplant while still in the womb — a remarkable achievement" (The Mercury News)

What do our experts say?

A tiny patient — still inside her mother’s womb — has been treated with a stem cell transplant, derived from her mother’s bone marrow, at UC San Francisco. WideCells CSO Professor Peter Hollands on a tremendous achievement in stem cell treatment: A huge achievement here, as a child successfully receives a stem cell transplant for alpha thalassemia while still in the womb – a genuine first. For…
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by Professor Peter Hollands 20 June, 2018

Feature

Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency and the future of stem cell treatment for primary immunodeficiencies

by Wideacademy - 20 June, 2018

  • Immune system disorder
  • Immunodeficiency

What is Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency? Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency (LAD) is a group of rare, inherited primary immunodeficiency syndromes. Children with the disease suffer frequent bacterial and fungal infections from birth. It is characterised by the impaired ability of white blood cells (leukocytes) to respond normally and travel to the site of infection or injury. People with Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency contract frequent infections. Their blood cells are unable ward them off normally. There are three types of the disease: LAD I, LAD II and LAD III. LAD I is the most common type. There…

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Who might be interested in this

  • Anyone interested in the future of medicine
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Second Opinion

"We're still a long way from a 'blood machine' — but progress is being made" (Futurism)

What do our experts say?

Blood on tap? Widecells CSO Professor Peter Hollands examines a breakthrough that could eventually revolutionise transfusions: Back in the 1990s, I was part of a team working to develop artificial bone marrow – not only for its own sake, but to eventually create what we called a ‘blood machine’, a device which could theoretically supply an endless number of new red blood cells for clinical use. It…
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by Professor Peter Hollands 19 June, 2018

Feature

Myelokathexis and stem cell treatment for inherited blood disorders

by Wideacademy - 18 June, 2018

  • Blood disorder
  • Neutropenia

What is Myelokathexis? Myelokathexis is an inherited blood disorder, characterised by severe lack of white blood cells, specifically an abnormally low level of neutrophils, known as neutropenia. Neutrophils are a type of white blood cell that are vital for fighting infection and inflammation. They secrete immune molecules and break down foreign invaders, releasing granules that kill the invading organism. They then undergo apoptosis (cell death) and are cleared by other phagocytic cells, meaning that the toxins are taken away with them. Myelokathexis is so named because ‘myelo’ refers to the…

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Who might be interested in this

  • Anyone interested in the future of medicine
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Second Opinion

"Spinal injury repair using stem cells? Latest research is a step in the right direction " (The Scientist)

What do our experts say?

Widecells CSO Peter Hollands looks at the latest progress towards the ‘holy grail’ of clinical research: Spinal injury repair – the cure of paralysis, essentially – is in many ways the holy grail of clinical research. It’s something that has been talked about for many years with little progress, and stem cell research in particular has been hamstrung by the fact that damaged spinal cords tend to…
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by Professor Peter Hollands 13 June, 2018

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