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Everything you need to know about stem cell treatments and their role in the future of healthcare and regenerative medicine.

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News, opinion and advice on stem cell research and treatment, from Wideacademy.

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Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome and how stem cell transplants can correct the blood-related dysfunctions it causes

by Wideacademy - 18 April, 2018

  • Blood disorder
  • Haemopoietic
  • Albinism

What is Hermanksy-Pudlak Syndrome? Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome (HPS) is a rare disease characterised by an absence of pigment in the skin, eyes and hair known as oculocutaneous albinism. These individuals have extreme sensitivity to the sun and artificial light and a higher than average risk of skin cancers from sun exposure. Most people with the disease are classed as legally blind, with common vision problems such as strabismus (cross-eyes) and nystagmus (involuntary eye movements). HPS also leads to blood platelet abnormalities. This causes problems with blood-clotting which can be life…

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How long can I store my stem cells for?

by Wideacademy - 17 April, 2018

  • Banking
  • Cord blood
  • Haemopoietic
  • Adult stem cells

It isn't easy to say with any certainty how long stem cells can be stored for. Most cord blood banks do not give an “expiry date” on storage, because with advances in storing procedures and general technological improvements, this is likely to change in any case. Cord blood banking is a relatively young industry. It has only been in existence for around 25 years so many cord blood banks use that as their benchmark, saying storage can be “for at least 25 years”. There is a reasonable chance that storage can last longer than that, but at present there is no reliable data to support this claim…

Clinical Settings 4

Who might be interested in this

  • Parents of young children
  • Anyone interested in the future of medicine
  • Students of stem cell research
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Sickle Cell Disease: how stem cell transplants can improve outcomes

by Wideacademy - Updated 16 April, 2018

  • Sickle Cell Disease
  • Blood disorder
  • Haemopoietic
  • Stem Cell Transplant
  • CRISPRs

What is Sickle Cell Disease? Sickle Cell Disease, also known as sickle cell anaemia, is a blood disorder caused by abnormal haemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein within red blood cells. People with the disease have haemoglobin molecules shaped like sickle cells — hence its name — that don’t move freely through blood vessels. Unlike healthy blood cells, sickle cells are hard, sticky and can get stuck, creating blockages anywhere in the body and depriving tissues and organs of oxygen. This can be very painful. Sickle Cell Disease is the most common genetic disorder in the world — with…

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DiGeorge Syndrome: the future of stem cell therapy for the genetic primary immunodeficiency disease

by Wideacademy - Updated 15 April, 2018

  • Bone Marrow
  • Stem Cell Transplant
  • Immunodeficiency
  • Thymus

What is DiGeorge Syndrome? DiGeorge syndrome is a genetic primary immunodeficiency disease caused by the deletion of some genes on chromosome 22, affecting around one in every 5,000 babies. The outcome for patients can be vastly different depending on which genes are missing. Although DiGeorge is an inherited disorder (if one parent has DiGeorge there is a 50% chance of passing it onto a child), more than 90% of cases are due to spontaneous mutations — which means there is no family history. In some cases the symptoms of DiGeorge syndrome are minimal and a patient may not be diagnosed until…

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SCID with the absence of T and B cells: how stem cell treatments are transforming outcomes for 'bubble baby' syndrome

by Wideacademy - Updated 12 April, 2018

  • Acquired blood disease
  • Immunodeficiency
  • Clinical trial
  • Stem Cell Transplant
  • Immune system disorder

What is SCID with the absence of T and B cells? Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), or “bubble baby” syndrome, is a rare genetic disorder. Sufferers have severely limited immune systems, leaving them unable to fight viruses or bacterial infections that would be minor in most people. There are various types of SCID with their own specific cause and symptoms. SCID with the absence of T and B-cells is a subtype of SCID. It is a group of disorders characterised by a lack of certain types of white blood cell, known as T and B cells. T cells are made in a gland called the thymus; while B…

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Who might be interested in this

  • Anyone interested in the future of medicine
  • Students of stem cell research
  • Parents of young children
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Pure Red Cell Aplasia and the future of treatment using stem cell therapies

by Wideacademy - Updated 11 April, 2018

  • Blood disorder
  • Anaemia
  • Stem Cell Transplant
  • Peripheral Blood Stem Cells

What is Pure Red Cell Aplasia? Pure Red Cell Aplasia or erythroblastopenia is a form of anaemia, a blood disorder caused by a reduction in the number of red blood cells. There are many different forms of anaemia. But people with Pure Red Cell Aplasia have bone marrow which is incapable of producing red blood cells. Symptoms of the disease are the same for all types of anaemia: pallor fatigue elevated heart-rate dizziness shortness of breath insomnia difficulty concentrating Because Pure Red Cell Aplasia comes on gradually someone with the disease might not outwardly appear to be as ill as…

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Sly Syndrome and future stem cell treatment of metabolic disorders

by Wideacademy - 10 April, 2018

  • Mucopolysaccharidoses
  • Metabolic disorder

What is Sly Syndrome? Sly Syndrome (SS) is part of a group of metabolic diseases called the mucopolysaccharidoses. It is caused by a deficiency of a specific lysosomal storage enzyme. Lysosomes are the recycling centres of cells, responsible for digesting nutrients and breaking down complex carbohydrates and fats for the cell to use. Without functional lysosomes, long chain carbohydrate molecules called glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) build up and cause progressive damage. GAGs help us to build bone, cartilage, tendons and connective tissue and are essential to normal growth. But if they’re not…

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Who might be interested in this

  • Anyone interested in the future of medicine
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Beta Thalassaemia Major: how stem cell therapies can shape future treatment

by Wideacademy - Updated 09 April, 2018

  • Blood disorder
  • Anaemia
  • Allogeneic
  • Stem Cell Transplant
  • Clinical trial

What is Beta Thalassaemia Major? Beta Thalassaemia is an inherited blood disorder affecting the production of haemoglobin. Haemoglobin is responsible for carrying oxygen to our body’s cells. Low levels of haemoglobin result in reduced oxygen in the body, which leads to a host of complications, including anaemia, fatigue, an irregular heartbeat and even cardiac arrest. Of the two forms, Beta Thalassaemia Minor and Beta Thalassaemia Major, the latter is the more severe. Symptoms of the disorder appear at birth and include: feeding problems anaemia distended abdomen enlarged spleen and liver…

Research 5
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Adrenoleukodystrophy and how gene therapy may be the biggest treatment breakthrough since Lorenzo's oil

by Wideacademy - Updated 09 April, 2018

  • Neurological impairment
  • Metabolic disorder
  • Haemopoietic
  • Gene Therapy
  • Leukodystrophies

What is Adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD)? Adrenoleukodystrophy is a potentially deadly metabolic disorder affecting the brain and the production of hormones. It is part of a group of genetic diseases called ‘leukodystrophies’ related to a lack of myelin, or “white matter”, the fatty, protective covering around nerve cells that enables signal transmission. Without it the brain and nervous system cannot function and it leads to neurological problems. People with ALD also have adrenal insufficiency, which means their impaired adrenal gland cannot produce enough adrenaline and cortisol — these…

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Who might be interested in this

  • Anyone interested in the future of medicine
  • Students of stem cell research
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Polycythaemia Vera and stem cell treatment for myeloproliferative disorders

by Wideacademy - 08 April, 2018

  • Myeloproliferative Disorder
  • Blood disorder
  • Acquired blood disease

What is Polycythaemia Vera (PCV)? Polycythaemia Vera (PCV) is a disease which causes the bone marrow to produce too many red blood cells. It can sometimes also lead to the over-production of white blood cells and platelets. An excess of blood cells causes the blood to become more viscous, which increases the risk of blood clotting and deep vein thrombosis. Blood clots affect 30% of people with the disease before they are diagnosed. If blood clots reach the lungs they lead to a pulmonary embolism, which is life-threatening. They may also cause a stroke or heart attack by travelling to the brain…

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